FANDOM


This is a working space for fleshing out a short intro bio video about Jaime.

As you're editing keep in mind that this should be about 3-5 minutes long, so cover the highlights -- interested readers can dig deeper in the text of the page.

See forum thread for more info.

I've provided a helpful format to let us segment the video into scenes.

Feel free to edit. :)

--~~~~

Scene 1: Intro

Narration: what should the narrator say? What information needs to be conveyed in this scene? write as if you were narrating a short bio

Visuals: what should we show to accompany and illustrate the narration? describe a scene or still from the show, you can also link to image/video but that is not required

Scene 2: Youth

Narration: what should the narrator say? What information needs to be conveyed in this scene? write as if you were narrating a short bio

Visuals: what should we show to accompany and illustrate the narration? describe a scene or still from the show, you can also link to image/video but that is not required

Scene 3: ...

Narration: what should the narrator say? What information needs to be conveyed in this scene? write as if you were narrating a short bio

Visuals: what should we show to accompany and illustrate the narration? describe a scene or still from the show, you can also link to image/video but that is not required


Scene 4: ...

Narration: what should the narrator say? What information needs to be conveyed in this scene? write as if you were narrating a short bio

Visuals: what should we show to accompany and illustrate the narration? describe a scene or still from the show, you can also link to image/video but that is not required

Add more scenes as needed


My rough draft

My rough draft. Long and may need to be edited, but a Tier A cast member (the core five) probably merits a long one. I wrote it in one big burst: --The Dragon Demands (talk) 20:29, April 26, 2017 (UTC)

Jaime Lannister – the Kingslayer. When we first meet Jaime he gives the outward appearance of being a stereotypical arrogant, amoral, handsome heir to his scheming father, but he is one of the most morally gray and conflicted characters in the entire series.

As a young boy, Jaime displayed preternatural skill with a sword, quickly becoming the most skilled and deadly swordsman of his generation. At 17 he was named to the Kingsguard, youngest in history, at the Tourney of Harrenhal – when everyone saw just how insane King Aerys Targaryen had become. At the royal court, Jaime had to stand and do nothing as the Mad King had innocent people burned alive because the voices in his head told him they were plotting his ruin – and to watch the other Kingsguard, living legends like Arthur Dayne and Barristan Selmy, the men who knighted Jaime, also stand by and do nothing to stop the Mad King.

Then Robert Baratheon killed Aerys’s son Rhaegar in single combat at the Battle of the Trident. Their few remaining supporters abandoned the Targaryens; realizing the end was near, the Mad King resolved that if the rebels took the capital city they would only rule over ashes. He had the Alchemists’ Guild prepare massive quantities of highly combustible Wildfire and hide them in caches all over the city. Tywin’s Lannister army arrived at King’s Landing before Robert’s and proceeded to sack it. Jaime begged King Aerys to surrender, but instead he ordered his alchemists to detonate all of the wildfire stockpiles, to burn the entire city along with all of the half a million men, women, and children trapped in it. Horrified at the mass murder of innocents that Aerys intended, Jaime finally chose to take action to stop him, killing the Mad King at the very foot of the Iron Throne. [Footage of Jaime’s confession to Brienne at Harrenhal about the wildfire plot from episode 3.5 “Kissed by Fire”] The defining moment of his life, Jaime was ever afterwards known as “the Kingslayer”, even by enemies of the Mad King, who still felt it was dishonorable that Jaime killed the king he had sworn to protect. [Footage of Barristan confronting Joffrey in Season 1, “A man who spilled the blood of the king he had sworn to defend?!”; footage of Jaime/Robert scene from Season 1 where he mocks “what did the Mad King say when you killed him?” and Jaime sternly says “the same thing he’d been raving for hours, “BURN THEM ALL!”] Nonetheless, due in no small part to the political and financial influence of his father Tywin over newly crowned King Robert, Jaime was not punished for this breach of his vows, and even allowed to remain in the Kingsguard. Meanwhile, Jaime’s twin sister Cersei became Robert’s new queen, in a loveless political marriage.

Yet unknown to all, Jaime had a much more shocking secret: he and Cersei had been having an incestuous sexual affair since they were young – and they continued their affair after she became Robert’s queen. Jaime was secretly the real father of all three of Cersei’s children. Privately, Jaime was not ashamed of his love for his own sister – given that the old Targaryen kings had wed brother to sister to “keep the bloodline pure”, nor was he ashamed of the adultery - given that Robert himself frequently cheated on Cersei with prostitutes, fathering numerous bastard children of his own. Yet as with the Targaryens, this incestuous bloodline quite probably drove their eldest child Joffrey insane (combined with Robert and Cersei’s terrible parenting skills). Jaime saw Joffrey for what he was but loved his younger two children, though he could never publicly act like a father to them.

Jaime grew up on tales of great knights of the past, but his exposure to the Mad King’s depravations and the apathy of the respected knights around him left Jaime utterly disillusioned that things like honor really exist. In his own warped way, this actually left Jaime as the most decent member of the Lannister family after Tyrion: Cersei has a skewed view of the world that she is truly a “good” person and her enemies are “evil”, but Jaime at the least doesn’t think of himself as a “good” person….because he doesn’t think there’s such a thing AS a “good” person.

When Robert made a royal visit to Winterfell, young Bran Stark stumbled upon Jaime and Cersei having sex in a castle tower – if he revealed what he saw it would mean the execution of Jaime, the woman he loved, and all three of his children, so he reluctantly pushed Bran out the tower’s window (though this only crippled him instead of killing him, he couldn’t remember what happened). This set off a chain of events building into the War of the Five Kings. [Show clip of Jaime fighting Ned Stark in episode 1.5 “The Wolf and the Lion”]

Jaime led half the Lannister army to besiege the Starks’ Tully allies at Riverrun, but was then decisively defeated in a surprise attack by young Robb Stark and the Northern army. Captured alive, Jaime spent the next year as a prisoner of the Starks. After the Greyjoys captured Winterfell, however, Catelyn Stark grew fearful for her remaining children still held captive in King’s Landing, so she freed Jaime for a prisoner exchange (against Robb’s wishes), and sent the warrior-woman Brienne of Tarth to escort him on foot through the Riverlands – a slow journey as the whole region had turned into a dangerous warzone.

Jaime and Brienne were captured on the way by a vicious group of soldiers working for Roose Bolton. They intended to rape Brienne but, disgusted at their petty cruelty, Jaime managed to talk them out of it to hold her for ransom instead. They grew insulted at Jaime’s offers that his own father would ransom him as well, so to prove they would not treat with his father, they cut off his sword-hand. Having defined his entire life solely by his amazing skill with a sword, Jaime lost the will to live. On arriving at Harrenhal, however, it turned out that Lord Bolton actually had wanted to ransom Jaime, before his men foolishly crippled him. To make amends to Tywin, Roose allowed Jaime to proceed to King’s Landing; though his men insisted on throwing Brienne into a bear-pit. Left questioning his own life’s worth and honor after losing his sword-hand, Jaime rushed back to selflessly save Brienne.

On returning to King’s Landing, however, his relationship with his remaining family members was strained – as his father still wanted him to leave the Kingsguard to become his heir instead of Tyrion. Soon, however, his son Joffrey was poisoned at his own wedding, and Cersei incorrectly accused Tyrion of being the murderer. Growing increasingly disenchanted with his family and Cersei, Jaime gave his new Valyrian steel sword Oathkeeper to Brienne and told her to leave and rescue Sansa Stark wherever she might be.

After Tyrion was sentenced to death, his loyalties torn, Jaime secretly freed his brother to have Varys help him escape Westeros – only for Tyrion to return to the Tower of the Hand and shoot their father dead for his betrayal. Jaime was left guilt-ridden once again, part of him wanting to kill Tyrion if he ever saw him again, part of him knowing that he hated his father for everything he did to Tyrion.

Jaime then went to Dorne in Season 5 because, as the showrunners state in the Blu-ray commentary, they wanted an excuse to put Indira Varma on-screen, derailing Jaime’s subplot, and not even giving us the real Dorne subplot from the novels. The less said about that the better. [Quote this verbatim]

By Season 6, the Lannisters’ rule was increasingly unraveling: the crown bankrupt and in debt to the Iron Bank of Braavos, dealing with the rise of the Faith Militant religious fanatics, and Cersei needlessly antagonizing the vital Lannister-Tyrell alliance. Jaime was determined to protect his last remaining child, the young boy-king Tommen. In the midst of this, Jaime was given the opportunity to command a Lannister army returning to the Riverlands to grind down the Starks’ few remaining allies, defiantly holding out under siege in their castles by the Freys.

Hoping to restore the image of Lannister power, Cersei encouraged Jaime to go – while Jaime himself had a newfound determination to act as an honorable knight. Jaime tried to peacefully negotiate the surrender of Robb Stark’s great-uncle Brynden Tully at Riverrun, but to no avail, as no one would believe that “the Kingslayer” would keep his word. Jaime then reversed this by capitalizing on his evil reputation to trick Brynden’s nephew Edmure, who had been captured by the Freys. Jaime claimed that he would kill Edmure’s infant son, then massacre the entire castle garrison after he ground them down through weight of numbers, unless Edmure commanded them to surrender without a fight. Having no reason to doubt that “the Kingslayer” would do this, Edmure complied – a great victory for Jaime, and even an honorable one, bloodlessly ending the siege and briefly restoring some measure of Lannister control in the Riverlands.

Afterwards, Walder Frey complimented Jaime on their mutual status as Kingslayers, survivors who would break any rule to survive. This comparison from Lord Frey, a man willing to kill guests at his own table, leaves Jaime once again shaken with self-loathing and disgust. [Show clip from Season 6 finale]

As Jaime returns to King’s landing, however, he is shocked to see Cersei’s actions in his absence: blowing up the Great Sept, killing hundreds of innocent people, along with most of the Tyrells – irreversibly turning their badly needed allies into utter enemies. Cersei’s plot even indirectly resulted in the death of their last child, Tommen. As Jaime looks on with horror, his sister even crowns herself ruling queen – which she has no right to whatsoever.

Jaime has been a flawed, conflicted character, torn between Brienne’s ideals of doing the right thing, and seduced by his toxic relationship with Cersei. When the time came before, Jaime did the right thing by killing the Mad King. Will Jaime try to stop Cersei now that she has truly gone too far? How many people will have to die before he finally does? Even if Jaime truly wants redemption at this point, CAN he be redeemed after everything he aided Cersei in doing?