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The Seven-Pointed Star (Histories & Lore)

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"The Seven-Pointed Star" is part of the Histories & Lore, a special feature in the Blu-ray of Season 5 of Game of Thrones. It is narrated by Jonathan Pryce as the High Sparrow.

SynopsisEdit

The High Sparrow details how "The Seven-Pointed Star" has influenced followers of the Faith of the Seven throughout the centuries.

NarrationEdit

The High Sparrow: The Father reached his hand into the heaevens and pulled down seven stars, and one by one he set them on the brow of Hugor of the Hill - to make a glowing crown. The Maiden brought him forth a girl as supple as willow, with eyes like deep pools, and Hugor declared that he would have her for his bride. So the Mother made her fertile, and the Crone foretold that she would bear the king four-and-forty mighty sons. The Warrior gave strength to their arms, whilst the Smith wrought for each a suit of iron plates.

But sadly the gods no longer walk the Earth among us, and you can see the mess we've made of their creation since. Yet, we have hope. The gods didn't abandon us in silence but gave us their holy words to guide us, collected in the oldest and holiest text of the Faith of the Seven: The Seven-Pointed Star. Divided into seven books for the seven aspects of God, in it we learn of the Father's justice, the Mother's mercy, the Maiden's innocence, the Crone's wisdom, the Warrior's strength, the Smith's labour and The Stranger's peace.

It is a long book. Many never read it in it's entirety, even if they could. When the Andals first sailed for Westeros filled with divine fire, every warrior carved a seven-pointed star into his body. For even that was easier than carving it's namesake into his mind. But one could perhaps argue that perhaps it wasn't the warriors but the septons and septas, armed with the holy text of the Seven-Pointed Star, who truly conquered Westeros.

The First Men has no letters, but the runes they would scratch onto rocks. No gods, but the faces they would carve into trees. But then came our holy men and women among them, bearing the very words of the gods under their arms. Trees and rocks were no match for the Seven-Pointed Star, and most of Westeros soon turned to the faith and to its guardians: their new Andal overlords.

Whilst the Andals soon fractured into warring kingdoms, the Faith remained whole and indivisible, bound together by the Seven-Pointed Star. When those kingdoms fell to Aegon and his dragons thousands of years later, the Faith remained subject only to The Seven above and the Seven-Pointed Star below. Or so it was supposed to be. Too often, our High Septons have lost their way, clouded by worldly wealth and power. No matter, we still have the Seven-Pointed Star. Men's will and virtue may fail, but the words never do. As men bow to their lords and lords to their kings, so kings and queens must bow before the Seven Who Are One. The knees of the powerful work the same as the knees of the weak, and were given to all for the same purpose: to bend before the gods... or break in the bending.

NotesEdit

  • In the novels, it is never directly stated that the Seven-Pointed Star is in fact divided into seven major sections, one for each aspect of the godhead - though it is heavily implied, as the one internal division mentioned is the "Book of the Maiden". That being said it is unclear if there are other sections or sub-sections in it (i.e., the Christian New Testament has four main "Gospel" sections but after that several other sections).

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